Regional Governance Model Progressing

Regional Governance Model Progressing

-Region residents to be asked to provide feedback when details completed-

October 6, 2017 – For Immediate Release

Progress is being made on developing the details of what a single-tier regional municipality would look like. Results are anticipated to be presented for public feedback in Spring, 2018.

“Regional governance is a complex and emotional subject, and we know that the top of mind question you have is: how would this be better than what we have now?” said Bob Coutts, FIP (Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership) Chair. “We have been working over the summer months on the details you have asked us for so that you can consider this question with as much information as possible.”

Municipal Chief Administrative Officers from each community gathered over the summer months to collaborate on determining what a services structure would look like. This is the most complex part of the governance model because not all communities in the region have all the same services and/or service levels, some new desired services were identified in a community survey in 2016, and both range of services and levels of those services are directly related to taxation and economic development that positions for the future. This work also involves presenting some options for residents to consider.

Governance model details are being generated in four areas:
• Governance: Developing a governance model (boundaries/divisions) to ensure citizens are properly represented by elected officials.
• Services: Establishing uniform service choices and service levels for the region.
• Taxation and Debt: Balancing service levels with taxation levels while positioning to be attractive to investment and new families in future.
• Identity: Ensuring each community retains its unique identity under a new regional context.

After the municipal election on October 16, 2017 the following process related to the regional governance initiative will be undertaken:
• November, 2017 – orientation session for newly-elected officials. Get their feedback and/or approval of the regional governance initiative to continue.
• Spring, 2018 – Public input session(s) to present proposed regional government model details.
• FIP considers any amendments based on public feedback.
• Final Regional Governance Plan is publicized.
• Individual Councils decide how they want to proceed by making a regional governance decision (i.e. a yes or no to amalgamation).
• If there is a decision to proceed with regional governance, submit amalgamation application to Minister of Municipal Affairs. Note: A decision to amalgamate is voluntary. An application to the Minister may involve some or all of the FIP municipalities.

To arrive at this phase of the regional governance initiative, FIP has completed significant research, including the following:

1) Evaluation of regional governance models in Canada
2) A regional services survey
3) Infrastructure assessment
4) Four public open houses
5) Municipal report card of current municipal operations

Informed by this research, FIP member communities unanimously voted to pursue development of the details of a proposed single tier governance model – from a number of potential governance models considered – as a best means to position region communities for the future.

FIP is comprised of representatives from all municipalities within the Flagstaff Region: the Towns of Daysland, Hardisty, Killam and Sedgewick, the Villages of Alliance, Forestburg, Heisler and Lougheed, and Flagstaff County. More information on the FIP Regional Governance Initiative can be found at www.flagstaffunited.ca

For more information, contact:
Bob Coutts
Chair, Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership
Email: couttshardware@persona.ca Phone: 780-679-4721

Regional Governance Initiative Still Working On Details

Regional Governance Initiative Still Working On Details

-Region residents to be asked to provide feedback when details completed-

June 12, 2017 – For Immediate Release

Public meetings initially scheduled for June will be delayed while the Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership (FIP) fleshes out more detailing of a proposed single-tier governance model region communities.

“Public feedback to date has told us that people want more details to consider – particularly around implications for taxes and services – to be able to determine if and how a proposed regional governance model offers benefits vs. the status quo, said Bob Coutts, FIP Chair. “While we have made some good progress on what governance can look like, at this point we don’t feel we have made enough progress on services, and taxation and debt. It’s a complex subject, and to avoid frustration we believe we need to put a reasonably detailed picture of regional governance on a wall for residents to make comment on and provide further suggestions.”

FIP has established a working group of elected officials and municipal Chief Administrative Officers from each region community to develop further governance model details. A best case scenario will see a regional governance framework completed by the Fall of 2017. FIP will then go back to region residents with a public consultation process that seeks feedback. A Regional Governance Initiative summary will be generated prior to municipal elections in the Fall of 2017 so that there is transparency about the initiative in advance of municipal elections. New Councils will be asked to review the proposed framework following municipal elections in October, 2017. A further round of public feedback may be pursued in late 2017 depending on modifications required as a result of resident engagement and consideration of new Councils. Each municipality – by motion of Council – will then subsequently decide whether their community will participate in a single tier governance model (amalgamation).”

The details that will be worked on over the summer are guided by four guidelines:

• Governance: Developing a governance model (boundaries/divisions) to ensure citizens are properly represented by elected officials.
• Services: Establishing service choices and service levels for all communities. Note: a summary of current services offered in the region is provided as a Backgrounder to this release.
• Taxation and Debt: Balancing service levels with taxation levels and ensuring debt remains the responsibility of the community that incurred it.
• Identity: Ensuring each community retains its unique identity under a new regional context.

FIP has completed significant regional governance initiative research, including the following:

1) Evaluation of regional governance models in Canada
2) A regional services survey
3) Infrastructure assessment
4) Four public open houses
5) Municipal report card of current municipal operations

Informed by this research, FIP member communities unanimously voted to pursue detailing of a proposed single tier governance model – from a number of potential governance models considered – as a best means to position region communities for the future.

FIP is comprised of representatives from all municipalities within the Flagstaff Region: the Towns of Daysland, Hardisty, Killam and Sedgewick, the Villages of Alliance, Forestburg, Heisler and Lougheed, and Flagstaff County. More information on the FIP Regional Governance Initiative can be found at www.flagstaffunited.ca

For more information, contact:
Bob Coutts
Chair, Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership
Email: couttshardware@persona.ca Phone: 780-679-4721

====================

-Backgrounder-
Flagstaff Region Current Services Summary
Note: the following is a list of current services that the Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership (FIP) has identified as currently being offered in communities in the region. The FIP working group is using this list, in addition to desired services/amenities identified in a regional services survey in 2016 – indicated at the end of this list, as a foundation for enough detailing of services considerations to be presented in a proposed regional governance model (e.g. what services, where, and service levels) so that residents can get a picture of what a proposed regional governance model looks like. Residents will be asked for feedback about this proposed regional governance model at a future date.

GOVERNANCE
COUNCIL
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION (human resources, finance (incl. assessment and assessment review board), records management, information technology, health and safety, public health, risk management)
AGRICULTURE SERVICE BOARD

PROTECTIVE SERVICES
PEACE OFFICER
FIRE
BYLAW ENFORCEMENT

DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
SUBDIVISION
SUBDIVISION APPEAL BOARD
PLANS (e.g. land use bylaw, municipal development plan)
BUILDING & DEVELOPMENT PERMITS
BUILDING INSPECTION

PUBLIC WORKS
ROAD CONSTRUCTION
ROAD/BOULEVARD/SIDEWALK MAINTENANCE
BUILDING MAINTENANCE
SNOW REMOVAL
BEAUTIFICATION (E.G. PLANTING)

UTILITIES
WATER
WASTEWATER
GARBAGE
RECYCLING
NATURAL GAS

SOCIAL SERVICES
FAMILY & COMMUNITY SUPPORT SERVICES

RECREATION
PARK
PATHWAY
BALL DIAMOND
SOCCER FIELD
PLAYGROUND
ARENA
POOL
GYM/FITNESS CENTRE
CURLING
BOWLING
TENNIS
GOLF
FOOTBALL FIELD
BASKETBALL COURT
PICKLEBALL COURT
CAMPGROUND

CULTURE
LIBRARY
ART GALLERY
PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE
MUSEUM
AGRIPLEX
COMMUNITY HALL
SENIORS CENTRE

COMMUNITY PROGRAMMING
RECREATION PROGRAM
LEISURE LEARNING

OTHER
SENIORS HOUSING
AIRPORT
CEMETERY

IDENTIFIED AMENITY GAPS
(surveyed in 2016 – greater than 12% response…can mean perception of need for enhanced quality, quantity, and/or access to service if it already exists)
MULTIPURPOSE FACILITY (daycare, yoga, etc.)
SPRAY PARK
HIKING/BIKING TRAILS
COMMUNITY CENTRE (meeting rooms, event capacity, youth/seniors centre, etc.)
FITNESS CENTRE
PLAYGROUND
INDOOR ARENA
SKATEBOARD PARK
EXPANDED LIBRARY

Regional Infrastructure Asset Management Project Completed

Regional Infrastructure Asset Management Project Completed

-Need for enhanced investment in regional infrastructure identified-

April 19, 2017 – For immediate release

An asset management project completed by Edmonton-based Urban Systems (www.urbansystems.ca) will help Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership (FIP) member communities reduce risks and better plan for the future.

The six month project assessed the state of a wide range of municipal infrastructure, including:
• Transportation (roads, sidewalks, and trails)
• Utilities (water, wastewater, stormwater, and gas)
• Parks and Facilities (buildings and contents)

“The results give us a vital understanding of infrastructure condition and future re-investment needs as we explore a regional governance model and work together to position our communities for success,” said Bob Coutts, Deputy Mayor of Forestburg and FIP Chair. “While results show that we have some challenges, if we work together we can plan for an ambitious future where we attract new investment and families to the region.”

Results conclude that there is a large amount of our region’s infrastructure that is past due or rapidly approaching time for replacement. This situation is not unique to our region, as many communities across Alberta and Canada are facing the same dilemma. Many communities installed water, sewer, pavement, and buildings at the same time and it is now time to replace that infrastructure. The estimated value of this replacement is approximately $90 million in the region. Most of the region’s municipalities spend most of their tax revenue on operating activity and do not have the revenue to start replacing capital. The amount of money (annually) needed to address the infrastructure deficit ranges from 50% to 140% of annual total municipal revenues in each community in the region. This poses interesting challenges, and will require some strategic decisions.

Data indicates there isn’t much room to raise revenue through increased tax rates, utility rates, special taxes, or increasing borrowing or draw-down on small reserves. “We need to remain competitive on our tax rates, but we also need good services to attract new families and businesses to the region,” Deputy Mayor Coutts said. “The best solution to manage taxes, while still providing good services supported by good infrastructure, is working together as a region.”

One of the planning tools FIP communities are being encouraged to use is Asset Management. Asset management is the process of making decisions about the use and care of infrastructure to deliver services in a way that considers current and future needs, manages risks and opportunities, and makes the best use of resources. The Government of Alberta has advised all municipalities to implement Asset Management planning in their decision making processes. It is anticipated it will become mandatory soon.

As Deputy Mayor Coutts noted, “You can understand the value asset management brings to planning for our communities with a simple comparison to planning on the farm. Accounting processes, like Tangible Capital Assets (TCA), will depreciate a tractor on the farm for accounting and tax purposes based on its original cost, but it doesn’t indicate when to replace it, what to replace it with, and what today’s cost will be to replace it. Asset management does help with decision making around how much an asset will cost to replace, and is why it is so important to the future of our communities.” Asset management also helps with understanding and mitigating strategic risks that FIP communities are facing. Factors such as economic downturns, retiring workforce, and changing demographics have significant impact on the ability of FIP communities in delivering services to their residents. By applying an Asset Management mindset to assess risks, FIP communities have positioned themselves in a more preferable place to address these risks and their potential impacts.

FIP will be hosting public meetings throughout the region in late spring, to present information that has been gathered, and discuss the regional governance proposal for how we can work together as a region.

FIP is comprised of representatives from all municipalities within the Flagstaff Region: the Towns of Daysland, Hardisty, Killam and Sedgewick, the Villages of Alliance, Forestburg, Heisler and Lougheed, and Flagstaff County.

For more information, contact: Bob Coutts, Chair, Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership
Email: couttshardware@persona.ca Phone: 780-679-4721.

Town of Sedgewick Withdraws From Regional Governance Initiative

Town of Sedgewick Withdraws From Regional Governance Initiative

-Governance initiative to proceed, with region residents to be asked to evaluate governance model when complete-

The Town of Sedgewick has withdrawn from the Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership’s (FIP) Regional Governance Sub-Committee. The Town of Sedgewick remains a member of FIP.

“Sedgewick Council has questions and concerns regarding Single Tier Regional Governance being presented as a sole option, the speed with which the initiative is moving forward, and in context of our input not finding favour with the Sub-Committee,” said Perry Robinson, Mayor, Town of Sedgewick. “When we first supported the Regional Governance Study there were to be more options on the table, with more time to discuss it. As it is, we feel that we should let the Sub-Committee work unobstructed by our questions and concerns and be given the chance to come up with the proposal in the established timeline. As Sedgewick remains a member of FIP, we will have our chance to hear that proposal at that time, with the opportunity to have our input then. In the meantime, Sedgewick wishes the Sub-Committee fruitful progress for a productive outcome.”

“While Sedgewick’s decision is unfortunate and we will leave the door open for Sedgewick to consider a single tier regional governance solution that will be presented to the region for consideration, the remaining eight communities in the region will proceed with no less energy because of our belief that the time has come to consider a governance solution that best positions us to stabilize and grow population and create new opportunities for our communities,” said Bob Coutts, Deputy Mayor of Forestburg and FIP Chair. “So many people in our region have an instinct that we need to do things differently in order for our communities to grow and prosper, and this is our best shot at moving forward more proactively.”

Bob noted that the Governance Initiative is a logical leveraging and expansion of 14 years of collaborative FIP work in the region that has recorded successes such as regional water and solid waste management, and that FIP isn’t about to put a halt to a current two-year process to look at governance options and present a ‘best’ option to region residents for consideration. “We owe it to our citizens to examine and consider if a single tier governance model is a way to proceed in the future.”

The Governance Sub-Committee’s current crafting of a single tier model of government is anticipated to be presented to the public for consideration and discussion in the late Spring. This model builds from a 2015 Study that tested deeper region-based governance barriers and opportunities, including identification of a regional collaborative governance pathway. Subsequent work initiated in May, 2016 completed each of an Infrastructure, and Community Sustainability Assessment of all communities in the region, a Resident Services Survey to better understand desired services and amenities, and research of successful examples of Region-Based Collaboration/Governance in Canada that led to region-resident engagement focused on proposed regional governance principles.

Based on the convergence of 18 months of prior governance study work, on December 5, 2016 municipal representatives from each of the FIP member communities unanimously motioned to design a single region-based governance model for region residents to consider when complete.

FIP is comprised of representatives from all municipalities within the Flagstaff Region: the Towns of Daysland, Hardisty, Killam and Sedgewick, the Villages of Alliance, Forestburg, Heisler and Lougheed, and Flagstaff County.

Media contact: Bob Coutts, Chair, Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership
Email: couttshardware@persona.ca Phone: 780-679-4721.

Committee Working on Single-Tier Governance Model for Consideration

Committee Working on Single-Tier Governance Model for Consideration

-Region residents to be asked to evaluate model when complete-

January 31, 2017 – For immediate release

A subcommittee of FIP (Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership), with representation from all the region’s municipalities, is currently crafting a single tier model of government for consideration and discussion by the public in each community.

“Right now, we all have a lot of questions about what this would look like and what adopting such a model would mean to each community. We are creating a solution that answers those questions,” said Bob Coutts, Deputy Mayor of Forestburg and FIP Chair.

The subcommittee is using information and data collected so far – spanning a year of work – which includes:
• A public opinion survey on services provided and desired.
• The results of a professional infrastructure management analysis that shows what re-investment in aging infrastructure like water/sewer pipes and roads is required.
• A viability assessment of current municipal operations.
• An agreed-to set of principles (governance, taxation, services, community identity) that reflects successful amalgamation implementations elsewhere.

There are very clear parameters around what can and can’t be done as the FIP subcommittee works out details of a model. As Perry Robinson, Mayor of Sedgewick said, “It states very clearly in the Municipal Governance Act that debt and savings remain with the municipality that created them. So, this isn’t about having another community pay off your debt or about losing savings. This model will be focused on how we work better together in the future to find long-term success in attracting families and investment, and being able to provide for quality of life-focused services. We owe this to the next generation.”

The governance model will be worked on over the next couple of months. When a solution is ready, FIP will go back to region residents with a public consultation process that seeks feedback and considers any further tweaking of the single tier governance model based on this feedback. Following that, each municipality – by motion of Council – will decide whether their community will participate in a single tier governance model (amalgamation).

In the mean-time, Questions of the Week – where people can ask any question (easiest to reach us at feedback@flagstaffunited.ca) and we generate some answers – will be posted on the www.flagstaffunited.ca website.

The Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership is comprised of representatives from all municipalities within the Flagstaff Region: the Towns of Daysland, Hardisty, Killam and Sedgewick, the Villages of Alliance, Forestburg, Heisler and Lougheed, and Flagstaff County. More information on the FIP Regional Governance Initiative can be found at www.flagstaffunited.ca

For more information, contact: Bob Coutts, Chair, Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership
Email: couttshardware@persona.ca Phone: 780-679-4721

Regional Leaders Eye Single Governance Model

Regional Leaders Eye Single Governance Model

– Direction of Communities Collaboration Initiative Taking Shape –

December 9, 2016 – For immediate release

The goal would be to dissolve Flagstaff County and all urban municipalities within its boundaries and have regional elections in October 2017 for a newly-created single municipality.

“All the research, data and consultation feedback we’ve collected over the past year clearly indicates that one regional government gives our communities the best chance of success moving forward,” said Bob Coutts, Deputy Mayor of Forestburg and FIP Chair. “This is a bold step, but we have to work together if we want to grow and attract new families and businesses to our communities.”

A sub-committee consisting of one representative from each of the nine-member FIP communities will immediately begin work on fleshing-out the details of a potential single-tier governance model for the region, based on the principles that have already been agreed to. The committee will focus on what the governance structure would look like, such as how many elected officials there should be and what their boundaries should look like. They will also be working on ideas to ensure there is still strong local representation within the regional model.

“We need to ensure that communities and citizens at-large have a strong local voice within a regional governance model. That is important if we are to be successful,” said Anita Miller, Mayor of Hardisty.

The committee will report back to FIP with a draft model in late-February or early-March. More public consultations on the initiative will follow in March and April. Details such as taxation rates, services levels and merging of bylaws could take up to three years to finalize after a new governance model is implemented.

“The goal is to ensure we can maintain or increase service levels for all citizens at a cost they are willing to pay,” said Gail Watt, member of the sub-committee and Mayor of Daysland. “Acting in silos and protecting what we have is no longer an option – it will do nothing to make our communities attractive to people and businesses.”

The FIP Committee was established in 2003 to find local solutions for regional issues and is made up of elected representatives from all municipalities within the Flagstaff region:  Towns of Daysland, Hardisty, Killam and Sedgewick, the Villages of Forestburg, Heisler, Alliance, Lougheed and Flagstaff County. More information on FIP and the initiative can be found at www.flagstaffunited.ca

Media contact: Bob Coutts, Chair, Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership

Email: couttshardware@persona.ca Phone: 780-679-4721

It’s Not About the Money, By Gail Watt, Mayor of Daysland

It’s Not About the Money, By 	Gail Watt, Mayor of Daysland

In Flagstaff Region, for many years collaboration and consultation have created successful programming for the citizens. Waste Management, Flagstaff Family and Community Services, Christmas Sharing program, Flagstaff Regional Housing, Emergency Services, Physician Recruitment and Disaster Training are just some of the excellent examples of how our collaboration benefits the communities.

So if the past is the best predictor of the future, it appears that we have an excellent road map to follow.

As Mayor and Councillor for the past four years, I have watched elected officials DECIDE to work together – not for the money, not for the fame, but for the reason of making this a better place for our citizens.

We have acknowledged the past hardships in relationships, today. We want to move on past what we were and become more than what we are meant to be.

We know everyone in the Region wants more and better services, as do we in Daysland. Becoming aware that we can control our destiny is the first step in actually controlling our destiny.

We want to become Daysland, where people want to belong. Daysland’s identity is assured to carry-on, and we aspire to welcome new people to create that economic future, to inspire community leaders, to come forward enjoying closer relationships throughout our region.

My personal advice in my Regional Governance Training Group has been: “We are not marrying for money”.

So come on, join in these conversations, surveys and interactions. Help us become Daysland, one of the best neighbours we can be.

Strome – One Community’s Journey, By Brian McGaffigan, Former Mayor/Current Strome Resident

Strome – One Community’s Journey, By Brian McGaffigan, Former Mayor/Current Strome Resident

For over 100 years, the Village of Strome was a central fixture for people in the region. It was a hub of activity – a place where people came to work, play and raise their families. But over time that began to change, and Strome struggled to maintain its population and economic activity, causing it to become less-and-less viable. Eventually, in January 2016, the Village dissolved into the County and became a hamlet. And I would argue that we are better for it today.

Here’s a short history lesson. Strome’s transition to becoming a hamlet really began in 2005, with the Alberta Urban Municipalities Association (AUMA) President’s Summit on Community Sustainability. This Summit challenged Strome Council’s way of thinking, as we began to re-define what “sustainability” meant to our community.

Increasingly, complicated government rules and regulations pressured Council to be innovative in providing administrative and public works services. As a result, Council contracted the Town of Killam to provide Public Works Services, and later Flagstaff County for Administration. For this innovative approach, the Village of Strome received the 2010 AUMA Municipal Sustainability – Innovative Communities Award.

This indicated that we were on the right track. So we pushed our thinking even further. Not long after, we found more efficiency by centralizing both Public Works and Administration Services to Flagstaff County. This meant our community now had access to a vast array of professionals and capacity we hadn’t had in the past.

Initially there was some negative reaction to these changes. Residents were concerned with losing community identity, reduced office hours and non-resident public works. However, the world did not end! The grass was cut, snow removed and maintenance carried out. In fact, extra grants were received to upgrade infrastructure, and a 10-year sustainability project plan was established and budgeted for. Village beautification projects were initiated. Communication was deemed essential for any change that was proposed, and the Village Newsletter kept residents up-to-date; meetings were held, and numerous individual conversations occurred in an effort to help people understand the situation.

The next stage of looking at sustainability came with the reduced revenue due to the closure of the elevator. The tax burden on residents was increasing each year simply to maintain what we had. The mil rate was heading for the 20 per cent mark!

This pushed Council to request a viability study by the Government of Alberta. The outcome of this study was that 98 per cent of residents voted to dissolve and become a hamlet within Flagstaff County. Council had done its job and was disbanded on January 1, 2016 – 11 years since the initial foray into Community Sustainability, and five years since the AUMA Award.

But residents faced more changes, and we got through them. For example, utility bills increased to reflect the increased infrastructure costs, but the mill rate for property taxes was more than halved, compensating for the increased utility bills – which would have continued to rise regardless.

However, with the transition money provided by the Alberta government, the County set out on an ambitious program of inspecting, maintaining and upgrading infrastructure. Some County residents asked if Strome had won the lottery – but no, these improvements came out of a long process of thinking differently and working toward sustainability.

This is the story: by cooperation with Killam and later Flagstaff County, Strome became sustainable in its administration and public works, maintaining its own identity before moving into a hamlet status as members of Flagstaff County. It took risks to break new ground, but this is only a beginning.

Now we are faced with even bigger challenges as a region and the need for more collaboration. Indeed big changes – perhaps to our governance model – are now essential. My hope is that as a region, we will rise to the challenge and make the sacrifices necessary to prepare for the future, and be an example of what is possible when rural people come together for mutual benefit.

Clear Themes Emerging From Community Open Houses

Clear Themes Emerging From Community Open Houses

Clear Themes Emerging From Community Open Houses

-Direction of Communities Collaboration Initiative taking shape-

November 4, 2016 – For immediate release

Early consultation shows the region’s residents are concerned about retaining community identity, would like to see closer relationships between communities and just want to get on with finding an appropriate solution, as three open houses for the Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership (FIP) Communities Collaboration Initiative are complete.

“Judging by the great attendance at the open houses, it’s clear people in the region care deeply about their communities and neighbours,” said Bob Coutts, Deputy Mayor of Forestburg and FIP Chair. “The conversations have been positive and robust, and I look forward to hearing more as we continue with the public engagement phase of the initiative.”

Two of the open houses in Alliance and Strome were led by FIP and took place in early-November, while a community-led open house was held in Hardisty late-October.  Two additional open houses are scheduled in Heisler and Hardisty on November 19th.

“Elected officials in the region need the public’s input to make a decision based on what people want, not what individual councils want,” said Anita Miller, Mayor of Hardisty. “I encourage everyone to get involved – attend an open house, talk to your councilors or submit your opinions through the website.”

Members of the public can download an information package or pick a copy up at their local municipal office. If people are unable to attend an open house, feedback can be given through the website as well.

The Flagstaff Communities Collaboration Initiative is exploring creative opportunities through greater regional collaboration. Using input from citizens and community leaders, its goal is to develop a new vision for the region to help it become more successful over the long-term. It is expected to be completed in December 2017.

The Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership is a committee comprised of representatives from all municipalities within the Flagstaff Region: the Towns of Daysland, Hardisty, Killam and Sedgewick, the Villages of Alliance, Forestburg, Heisler and Lougheed, and Flagstaff County.

For more information, contact:

Bob Coutts

Chair, Flagstaff Intermunicipal Partnership

Email: couttshardware@persona.ca Phone: 780-679-4721